Common Cockpit Far from Ordinary

Lockheed Martin delivers 300th Common Cockpit to Navy for MH-60 multi-mission helicopters

 

file The Common Cockpit features four multi-function, color display screens to provide the crew with instant information on everything from weather to weapons and sensors.

There is nothing ordinary about Lockheed Martin’s Common Cockpit.

Ten years ago, the Common Cockpit became the first glass cockpit to ever receive NAVAIR’s Instrument Flight Certification. Since then, the Common Cockpit avionics suite has recorded more than 375,000 flight hours for the Navy’s MH-60 Romeo and Sierra helicopters. And on February 23 at its Owego, N.Y. facility, Lockheed Martin delivered the 300th Common Cockpit to the Navy.


Lockheed Martin’s Common Cockpit avionics suite has recorded more than 375,000 flight hours for the U.S. Navy’s MH-60 Romeo and Sierra helicopters. Courtesy U.S. Navy.

“The Common Cockpit underwent one of the most demanding certification processes at NAVAIR, and is now the standard by which all cockpits are judged,” said Capt. Dean Peters, NAVAIR program manager for H-60 Multi-Mission Helicopters. “Our MH-60R and MH-60S crews rely on this system to support the broad range of missions and operations they fly every day.”

The Navy operates 87 Romeos and 180 Sierras and plans to purchase 280 MH-60S and 300 MH-60R aircraft with the Common Cockpit avionics suite through 2015. Lockheed Martin integrates the Common Cockpit aboard the Romeo. For the Sierra, Lockheed Martin procures and assembles Common Cockpit components for delivery to Sikorsky for final integration into the helicopter.

The Common Cockpit enables the aircrew to perform diverse missions, including anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, combat search and rescue, vertical replenishment and airborne mine countermeasures.

Based on open architecture and commercial-off-the-shelf technology, the Common Cockpit features four large, flat-panel, multi-function, night-vision-compatible, color display screens to provide the crew with instant information on everything from weather to weapons and sensors.
“The Common Cockpit reduces workload and increases situational awareness for Romeo and Sierra crews,” said George Barton, director of Naval Helicopter programs at Lockheed Martin. “Having a common cockpit also reduces the logistics footprint and total ownership cost to the Navy.”

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