USA Science & Engineering Festival Honored with Vandenberg Award

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The USA Science & Engineering Festival received the 2013 Hoyt S. Vandenberg Award from the Air Force Association, September 16, in recognition of the festival's contributions to aerospace education and for encouraging the next generation of scientists and engineers.

"This award is given for the most outstanding contributions in aerospace education,” said Air Force Association Chairman of the Board retired Lt. Gen. George K. Muellner. “We applaud the distinguished success of the Festival in its unique ways to increase public awareness about the importance of science and to encourage youth to pursue careers in science and engineering,"

The 2012 USA Science & Engineering Festival reached 550,000 people around the world and drew an astonishing 200,000 attendees and participants to the three day event including government officials and key White House staff. Nearly 400 Lockheed Martin volunteers supported the corporation’s 44 interactive exhibits and 3,000 hands-on activities.

Co-founded by serial entrepreneur Larry Bock and Lockheed Martin Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Dr. Ray O. Johnson, the next festival will occur April 25-27, 2014, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The country’s only national science festival is free to attend, and will feature over 750 science, engineering, technology and math (STEM) organizations presenting hands-on, fun science activities.

"We are honored to receive the Vandenberg Award from the Air Force Association,” Bock said. “It is a gratifying reflection of not only the USA Science & Engineering Festival itself, but the importance of STEM education for our nation's security and economic prosperity.”

Today’s economy demands new urgency for STEM education.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. will have more than 1.2 million job openings in STEM-related fields by 2018; yet, there will be a significant shortage of qualified college graduates to fill these careers. The nation’s looming technical talent shortfall will have an impact far beyond any single firm or sector. Science and engineering are not just crucial for national security; they are critical for economic growth.

As an industry leader in global security and information technology, Lockheed Martin provides products and services that address some of the nation’s most critical issues. The corporation knows first-hand the criticality of having future science and engineers in the pipeline. In 2012, Lockheed Martin contributed more than $10 million to programs and organizations to improve the quality of STEM education; enhance academic performance, training and recruitment of qualified teachers; and engage students with hands-on activities and inquiry-based learning opportunities.

“We are committed to helping students see the benefits of pursuing STEM careers,” Dr. Johnson said. “Engineers, scientists and mathematicians make a difference to our country every single day – whether exploring the far reaches of space, fighting cyber-criminals or building the world’s best fighter jets.”

High-tech industry leaders like Lockheed Martin fuel innovation, boost development and productivity and generate employment opportunities. The impetus for improving the quality of STEM education is clear. If the U.S. intends to remain the world’s technological leader, the country must act today, inspiring and enabling young people to thrive in advanced-tech careers. 

September 16, 2013

highlights
  • The Hoyt S. Vandenberg Award is given for the most outstanding contributions in aerospace education
  • According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. will have more than 1.2 million job openings in STEM-related fields by 2018; yet, there will be a significant shortage of qualified college graduates to fill these careers.
  • “We are committed to helping students see the benefits of pursuing STEM careers,” Dr. Johnson said. “Engineers, scientists and mathematicians make a difference to our country every single day."