Extending a Legacy of C-130 Training

Maj. Devon Cummings, an 86th Operational Support Squadron operations officer, right, and Capt. Fred Backhus, a C-130J Super Hercules pilot, operate the new C-130J simulator at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. The Maintenance and Aircrew Training System allows aircrew and maintainers to train on a variety of scenarios that could be potentially costly, or dangerous, in real aircraft. Photo Credit: Michael Keller/Stars and Stripes

C-130 pilots and aircrews answer the call for a diverse set of missions worldwide, from combat to special operations, humanitarian and aerial refueling, and firefighting to search and rescue. Preparing for these missions – and whatever the future holds – depends on training.

With more than 200,000 pilots and aircrew trained to date, Lockheed Martin is committed to supporting customers worldwide for air mobility mission readiness. Here’s a look at recent achievements for Lockheed Martin-led C-130 training.

Delivering the First C-130J Maintenance and Aircrew Training System to Ramstein AB

In August, Ramstein Air Base celebrated the delivery of the first U.S. Air Force overseas flight simulator for the C-130J Maintenance and Aircrew Training System (MATS) II program. The simulator will be used to train C-130J aircrews and the maintainers that keep the fleet mission-ready.

Under the C-130J MATS II contract, Lockheed Martin is delivering a number of aircrew and maintenance training devices to support air and ground-based training requirements, including high fidelity weapons systems trainers, part-task trainers and training aids.

Visitors take a tour of the new C-130J simulator at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. Ramstein is the first U.S. Air Force base overseas to employ a C-130J simulator for its pilots and aircrews. The simulator is expected to save crews time and money, cutting back on fuel costs for training missions and travel time to the States for simulator training. Photo Credit: Michael Keller/Stars and Stripes

With a simulator in Germany, Ramstein crews will be able to do more training on the ground and less in the air, which will cut fuel costs and aircraft wear and tear. “We can do pretty much anything, training-wise, we need to,” said C-130J pilot Capt. Fred Backhus. “It’s about as realistic as it can get without being in the actual airplane.”
 

Investing for the Future with a New International Training Center

C-130J Training

Lockheed Martin recently announced plans to build a new International Training Center to help meet the global demand for C-130J and LM-100J training. The ITC will be located in Marietta, Georgia in the same facility that is home to the C-130J – the world’s most advanced military tactical airlifter – and the LM-100J, a civil multi-purpose air freighter. This location offers easy access for domestic and international customers with its proximity to Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, which serves more than 60 international cities in 50 countries. 

“With our experience as the C-130J and LM-100J manufacturer and decades of training expertise, we’re investing to deliver an integrated solution to prepare the next generation of air mobility pilots and aircrews. As militaries and commercial customers modernize and expand their fleets, we saw an opportunity to offer increased value to our customers through this International Training Center.” — Jon Rambeau, vice president and general manager of Lockheed Martin Training and Logistics Solutions.

In addition, Lockheed Martin announced a series of training contracts this year which will extend support of C-130 mission readiness for years to come.