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Extended Area Protection and Survivability

EAPS

In October 2010, Lockheed Martin received a follow-on contract from the U.S. Army Research Development & Engineering Command/Aviation Missile Research, Development & Engineering Center to support the service’s Extended Area Protection & Survivability Integrated Demonstration (EAPS ID).

The EAPS ID is a science and technology program focused on developing and demonstrating critical technologies necessary to bridge the gap between the initial counter rocket, artillery and mortar (C-RAM) capability and the enhanced protection envisioned in the future. Lockheed Martin's concept for destroying C-RAM targets is based on an affordable, extremely agile, Hit-to-Kill interceptor that is less than 3 feet long, about 2 inches in diameter and weighs less than 10 pounds at launch.

The small interceptor will meet the Army's goal of $16,000 per round at specified quantities. Paired with a high frequency fire control sensor, the Hit-to- Kill interceptor provides robust destruction of C-RAM targets at tactically significant ranges.

Lockheed Martin’s EAPS ID solution has focused on affordability from the beginning. All of the company’s design decisions have been made with an awareness of the impact on cost. This has spurred Lockheed Martin to leverage technologies from diverse industries ranging from mobile telephones to medical diagnostics. The result is a low-cost solution using proven Hit-to-Kill technology.

Flight testing is currently underway with Lockheed Martin conducting a successful series of target tracking tests the first week of April 2012 followed by a successful Controlled Test Vehicle (CTV) flight test on May 26, 2012. A number of guided flight tests against live targets are scheduled for the second half of 2012.

 

EAPS

EAPS demonstrated its agility during the first guided flight test, which closely replicated a tactical situation. EAPS is designed to defeat Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems.

EAPS

EAPS demonstrated its agility during the first guided flight test, which closely replicated a tactical situation. EAPS is designed to defeat Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems.

EAPS

EAPS demonstrated its agility during the first guided flight test, which closely replicated a tactical situation. EAPS is designed to defeat Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems.

EAPS

An EAPS Controlled Test Vehicle flight test was successfully conducted on May 26, 2012. The Lockheed Martin EAPS solution uses a Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor that defeats Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

EAPS

An EAPS Controlled Test Vehicle flight test was successfully conducted on May 26, 2012. The Lockheed Martin EAPS solution uses a Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor that defeats Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

EAPS

An EAPS Controlled Test Vehicle flight test was successfully conducted on May 26, 2012. The Lockheed Martin EAPS solution uses a Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor that defeats Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

EAPS

An EAPS Controlled Test Vehicle flight test was successfully conducted on May 26, 2012. The Lockheed Martin EAPS solution uses a Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor that defeats Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

EAPS

An EAPS Controlled Test Vehicle flight test was successfully conducted on May 26, 2012. The Lockheed Martin EAPS solution uses a Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor that defeats Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems. (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

EAPS

EAPS demonstrated its agility during the first guided flight test, which closely replicated a tactical situation. EAPS is designed to defeat Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current systems.

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Extended Area Protection and Survivability

EAPS successfully conducted the first guided flight test to characterize the seeker, guidance, navigation and control systems of its Miniature Hit-to-Kill interceptor.