Naval EW

Naval EW
Total control. Imagine having full use of your abilities to detect, track, and engage opponents—all while clouding their abilities to strike at—or even sense—you. That's the concept behind the U.S. Navy’s work to upgrade electronic warfare capabilities on all ships in its surface fleet.

“Right now, every part of the Navy’s fleet has some ability to detect threats,” explains Joe Ottaviano, program director. “But it’s often happening in real-time. They see us, we see them, and both sides are trying to figure out what to do. The Navy’s goal is to get enough information so ships can detect a threat and respond before the other side even knows we’re there.”

The U.S. Navy surface fleet is providing an evolutionary succession of enhancements to its AN/SLQ-32 electronic warfare system currently installed on its ships, with Lockheed Martin’s proven Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP). This series of upgrades will incrementally add new defensive technologies and functional capabilities. Our Nulka Countermeasures system adds yet another layer to a ship’s layered self-defense system against radio-frequency anti-ship missile attacks.


Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP)

WHAT IS IT?

For many years, electronic warfare capabilities aboard surface ships were provided by a passive electronic countermeasures system called the AN/SLQ-32. But an increased— and increasingly more sophisticated—electronic warfare threat prompted the service to upgrade its systems. Enter the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program…SEWIP.
 
WHY IT MATTERS

SEWIP allows sailors to protect the ship from the threats you can see (incoming missiles) to those you can’t (radar jamming).
 
FAST FACTS

  • SEWIP is a series of evolutionary developments, called block upgrades, which, at each stage improve and modernize the existing AN/SLQ-32 infrastructure.
  • The Navy established SEWIP in 2002. Block 1 provided enhanced electronic warfare capabilities to existing and new ship combat systems to improve anti-ship missile defense, counter-targeting, and counter-surveillance capabilities. The U.S. Navy awarded Lockheed Martin the SEWIP Block 2 contract in 2009 to upgrade the antenna, receiver, and combat system interface for the AN/SLQ-32.

MK234 Nulka Offboard Countermeasure System

WHAT IS IT?

If it looks like a ship, maneuvers like a ship, and has the radar signature of a ship…it’s probably a Nulka decoy. This offboard countermeasures system is used on every cruiser and guided missile destroyer in the U.S. Navy, surface combatants in the Australian Navy, and Canada’s Iroquois-class.
 
WHY IT MATTERS

The Nulka decoy simulates the radar return from a large ship overlapping the target signal. To an enemy radio-frequency anti-ship missile, it’s a more attractive target instead. For U.S. and allied ships, it’s the smartest and most reliable way to draw missile fire away from our fleet and defeat the threat.
 
FAST FACTS

  • More than 1000 Nulka decoy payloads have been delivered to the U.S. and Australian Naval fleets since we began working with BAE Australia in 1994.
  • Lockheed Martin developed Nulka with our Australian partners. In Aboriginal Australian dialect, nulka means “be quick.”
  • Nulka can be operated on its own, or act as part of a multi-layered ship self-defense system.