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Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle

Orion

Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor building the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, NASA’s first spacecraft designed for long-duration, human-rated deep space exploration. Orion will transport humans to interplanetary destinations beyond low Earth orbit, such as asteroids, the moon and eventually Mars, and return them safely back to Earth.

The Orion program will enable NASA to:

  • Carry out a robust human and robotic exploration program that is both sustainable and affordable
  • Extend human presence across the solar system to our planets, asteroids and other destinations
  • Develop the innovative technology, knowledge, and infrastructure needed to support more challenging human space exploration missions
  • Promote international and commercial participation in exploration to further advance U.S. scientific, security and economic interests

This state-of-the-art spacecraft provides solutions that are extensible to future missions, and focuses first and foremost on crew safety:

  • Accommodates a crew of up to six astronauts
  • Provides safe ascent abort with no black zones
  • Enables safe abort opportunities during all mission phases
  • Withstands re-entry at speeds greater than 20,000 miles per hour

Lockheed Martin leads the Orion industry team which includes major subcontractors Aerojet Rocketdyne, United Technologies Aerospace Systems, and Honeywell, as well as an expansive network of minor subcontractors and small businesses in 45 states across the country.

In addition, Lockheed Martin contracts with hundreds of small businesses across the United States through an expansive supply chain network. There are approximately 3,000 people who work on the Orion program nationwide, including contractors, civil servants, subcontractors, suppliers and small businesses.

A New Era of Exploration

The Lockheed Martin-built Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle takes shape for advanced missions capable of safely transporting humans to asteroids, Lagrange Points and other deep space destinations that will put us on an affordable and sustainable path to Mars.

NASA Exploration Flight Test-1 Animation

This animation depicts the proposed test flight of the Orion spacecraft in 2014. During the test, which is called Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), Orion will launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., perform two orbits, reaching an altitude higher than any achieved by a spacecraft intended for human use since 1973, and then will re-enter and land in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of the United States

NASA's Orion: From Factory to Flight

NASA is making steady progress on building the Orion spacecraft, which will take astronauts deeper into space than ever before. Take a look at the latest achievements and milestones in "Orion: From Factory to Flight" as Orion gets ready for its first orbital test flight in 2014.

A New Era of Exploration

The Lockheed Martin-built Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle takes shape for advanced missions capable of safely transporting humans to asteroids, Lagrange Points and other deep space destinations that will put us on an affordable and sustainable path to Mars.

STORRM Engineers Discuss Technology

Lockheed Martin STORRM engineers discuss design details of the ground docking target in preparation for the STORRM on-orbit technology demonstration on STS-134.

Lockheed Martin STORRM Engineers

Lockheed Martin STORRM team members review the possible configurations of the International Space Station the may encounter during docking operations.

STORRM Box Installation

Technicians at Kennedy Space Center’s Orbiter Processing Facility-2 install the first of two STORRM boxes between the orbiter docking system and the crew module aboard space shuttle Endeavour. NASA and its industry partners Lockheed Martin and Ball Aerospace developed the new sensor technology that will make it easier and safe for spacecraft to dock to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Jim Grossman, August 2010

ISS Docking Target with STORRM

ISS Docking Target with STORRM reflectors attached. These reflectors are arranged in an asymmetric pattern to allow STORRM to calculate Endeavour’s position and orientation during the final phases of docking. Image Credit: NASA

Orion Testing

High intensity, studio grade lamps provide a full range of variable orbital lighting effects that simulate the position and intensity of the sun.

Orion Testing in the SOSC

Six-degree-of-freedom robots provide precise spacecraft motion driven by navigation simulations of an Orion approach to an asteroid.

STORRM Engineers Discuss Technology

Lockheed Martin STORRM engineers discuss design details of the ground docking target in preparation for the STORRM on-orbit technology demonstration on STS-134.