Palo Alto Colloquia

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Next Colloquia 

MARCH 5, 2015        

THE EVOLUTION OF THE REFLECTOR TELESCOPE, PART 2 - Dr. Kenneth Lum

With the success of George Ellery Hale and George Willis Ritchey in building large reflecting telescopes at Mt. Wilson in the early 20th Century, this type of instrument became the dominant type of telescope of professional astronomy. New innovations were developed in mirror making, mounting machinery, and detector technology. Reflecting telescopes subsequently became ever larger as astronomers probed deeper into the Universe eager to seek out the new discoveries their superior light grasp could enable. With time, more exotic innovations were applied such as the Schmidt camera, the application of digital computers, CCD detectors, altazimuth mounts, adaptive optics, spin casting giant light weight mirrors, multiple mirror telescopes, and space based telescopes, to name a few.

Due to their ease of construction, amateurs also began making their own reflecting telescopes in the 1920’s enabling the spread of amateur astronomy as a recreational activity. Here we see mostly the construction of simple Newtonian telescopes, the trickle down of advanced technologies from the professional realm such as computerized mounts, inexpensive CCD cameras, and the growth of a commercial recreational optics industry. Today the modern amateur has an enormous choice of high quality optical instrumentation at very modest prices. All this has enabled amateurs to engage in everything from casual visual observing to advanced electronic imaging, to the collaboration of professional and amateur astronomers to produce publishable science.

Dr. Kenneth Lum is recently retired from the practice of Emergency Medicine. Since high school, he has also been an enthusiastic amateur astronomer, having built two telescopes at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago and a large Newtonian reflector when he reentered amateur astronomy in 1986. He pursued an interest in astronomical photography during the 1990s and continues to study the history of astronomy and astronomical instrumentation. Dr. Lum is currently interested in ways to enhance the performance of small telescopes with the use of a photomultiplier eyepiece and astronomical video cameras. Since 1994, he has been traveling with the Antique Telescope Society almost annually visiting different historical astronomical observatories.              

More Colloquia

Mar. 12 - Dr. Amin Arbabian, Stanford University: Miniaturized Passive Radios for Wireless Tagging and IOT Applications

Mar. 19 –  NO COLLOQUIUM

Mar. 26 - Dr. Tom Passell, former ATC employee and recently retired from SRI and EPRI: Sneaking Past the Coulomb Barrier in Metals - A.K.A. Deuteron Stripping

Future Colloquia

Note, the following are TENTATIVE ONLY.  When the time is closer, I will send out announcements

Information will be posted on the colloquium website(s).

2015

Mar. 05 - Dr. Kenneth Lum: The Evolution of the Reflector Telescope, Part 2

Mar. 12 - Dr. Amin Arbabian, Stanford University: Miniaturized Passive Radios for Wireless Tagging and IOT Applications

Mar. 19 –  NO COLLOQUIUM

Mar. 26 – Dr. Tom Passell, former ATC employee and recently retired from SRI and EPRI: Attempts to Confirm the "Deuteron Stripping in Metals" Hypothesis

Apr. 2 – Dr. Tom Shutt, SLAC: Do Wimps Rule? The LUX & LZ Experiments and The Search For Cosmic Dark Matter

Apr. 9 – TBA

Apr. 16 – TBA

Apr. 23 – Dr. Richard Reis, Stanford University:  The Fullbody Bicycle

Apr. 30 – Dr. Paul Doersch: Kespry, Commercial Drones

May 7 – Dr. Gordon Myers, President Astronomical Society of the Pacific: Amateur Astronomers Collaborating with and Helping Professional Astronomers

May 14 – Mr. Greg Edwards: Any Sufficiently Advanced Technology is Indistinguishable From Magic

May 21 – Dr. Michael Mc Kubre, SRI:  LENR

May 28 – Dr. Steven Adachi, Lockheed Martin: Quantum Computing at Lockheed Martin

June 4 – TBA

June 11 – SUMMER BREAK, START SERIES AGAIN IN MID to LATE SEPTEMBER 2015


If you have any comments or suggestions for speakers, please call Dr. Gary Bush at (650) 424-2267 or Dr. Stuart McHugh at (650) 424-2561.

To sign up for our mailing list, contact stuart.mchugh@lmco.com

Colloquia presentations via Microsoft Lync

All Colloquium talks begin at 4:15 pm

Audio: AT&T Conference call:
408-742-3800, Pin 729281#

For further information contact:
Dr. Gary Bush
650-424-2267
gary.bush@lmco.com
or
Dr. Stuart McHugh
650-424-2561
stuart.mchugh@lmco.com