Engineering Spotlight: Milton B.

LM-engineerweek-page-header

Milton Baxter


What is your role at Lockheed Martin?
Operations Manager for CETO Leadership Programs

What inspired you to pursue a career in engineering?

I always had a curiosity of how things worked the way they do. I also had a desire learn how to build consumer electronics, specifically stereos.
 

The theme for National Engineers Week is “Engineering New Horizons”. How are you engineering new horizons?

My focus this year is to be financially in tune with the industry and economic changes. I utilize multiple resources to track trends in the industry and new technologies that are beginning  to

 

make headlines. I think of ways these new technologies can be integrated into current solutions, the impact it may have on Lockheed Martin, and what areas of development our employees may need to keep LM leading our industry.


What advice would you offer high school students considering a major in engineering?
Educate yourself on your options, while you are looking at post grad schools, and during your four year degree program. Engineering creates many career opportunities. If you are not educated on your options, the first five years of your career could slow your professional growth, as you seek out what type of career you want.

Describe a challenging moment you may have faced in college and how you got through it. 
Realizing that I had to adjust my study habits to fit the college atmosphere. In K-12, you are taught to learn by remembering and reciting what your teacher has taught you. College teaches theory and challenges your knowledge by testing you through scenarios. I realized I had to adjust my study habits from individual to group sessions. Group sessions with my classmates gave me different insight on the lesson and how the professor presented the material. Along with the group sessions, I focused on getting sufficient rest and no longer cramming for exams. I successfully graduated with an Electrical Engineering degree by making these minor adjustments.

What advice would you offer to college students seeking a career in engineering?
Establish a relationship with corporations as soon as possible. Internships and student organizations like the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) present opportunities for you to build a relationship with corporations before you enter the job market. Learn the company’s current focus areas, and their future state vision. Find ways to relate these things back to your curriculum, and prepare to incorporate your experience into your interviews.Educate yourself on your career options, and the geographic areas those careers are typically located. Most people have an idea of the geographic area they would like to work. Your chosen engineering career field may or may not sync with where you would like to live.

Engineer Opportunities